Last entry for the year!!

Found this video while tweeting a little while back. One thing Japan is not… (to me) is boring. Thank you for reading!!

Happy New Year!

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Enter “The Marshmallow Girl…,”

Or Plus size women (in America). Recently RocketNews24 posted an article about Japan’s newest trend acknowledging “Marshmallow Girls”. A “Marshmallow Girl” is a voluptuous/”chubby” Japanese woman.

TGIF everybody…

Plus Size Model, Goto Seina modeling for Japan's new plus-size women’s magazine, la farfa.
Plus Size Model, Goto Seina will model for Japan’s new plus-size women’s magazine, la farfa.

This recent acceptance really surprised me. Why? Well, any American who has ever dated a Japanese woman (let alone married one) must be aware of the tremendous pressure for Japanese women to be super skinny in Japanese society. The pressure is very intense, ten fold what we put up with in America. It’s a nightmare for any girl who is bigger than a (American) size four .

To get an idea of what I mean, the picture below illustrates, “how plump the figure is thought to be, and assuming that “0% chubbiness” is the representation of the average “acceptable” size, you should get a pretty good idea of how strict Japanese society is with curvy figures.” – Joan Coello, RocketNews24

Percentage of socially acceptable "chubbiness" in Japan
Percentage of socially acceptable “chubbiness” in Japan with 0% being average.

When I first met my wife she was around 60% and (over the years) went up to 80% but is now down 50% with her goal being 40%. Her goal is 40% because that’s comfortable for her and is what she wants. I love 100% of her all the time but my opinion doesn’t matter when she’s looking in the mirror and shopping for a new outfit. She strongly believes Japan is way over due in changing its attitude towards larger women.

Plus size models
Japanese plus size models 

I can’t imagine the social repercussions this will have on little girls’ self image/confidence. I hope this will broaden perceptions of what people consider to be healthy & attractive. It’s really why I’m taking the time to even mention this.

Welcome to the new millennium Japan!

"Marshmallow Girl" model
“Marshmallow Girl” model

What do you think?

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Japan’s Micro Apartment

My wife and I want a home to call our own but a big part of that is that we want space to stretch out.

My sister-in-law wants the same for her family and took us house hunting with her during our last visit. I remember thinking a few places we saw were really small. But not this small…

Thoughts?

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Somewhere in Japan: Fujigoko (Winter 2010)

Every time I’ve gone to Japan, I’ve been fortunate enough to explore Tokyo and the surrounding prefectures. As a result, I’ve taken hundreds of photos.

I thought I’d share some more.

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Welcome to Fujigoko
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Most street signs featured silhouettes of Fuji-san.
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Regional Old house.
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Regional modernized house with traditional roofing.
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Modern estate. We were all hoping someone would come out and invite us in for tea…
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Abstract closeup of the pond. Looks like a painting.
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Another. No camera tricks other than a polarizer.
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One of my favorite photos from that day.
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I think we were at an old corn mill. Although we had (really great) soba for lunch.
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This place was packed with people but I still managed to steal this shot. I think this was attempt five or six. Totally worth the effort and wait.
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Roof Closeup
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The only (say it like a Nihonjin) Ma-ku-do-na-lu-do’s I ever saw written in Katakana. The rest were in english.

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