Hokokuji Temple, Kamakura

Yes, more pictures from one of our favorite (small & peaceful) places in Japan.

At-the-Bamboo-Temple
At the Bamboo Temple
Bamboo-Temple-Roof
Bamboo Temple Roof
Into-the-Bamboo
Into the Bamboo…

Visit for yourself.

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More Kamakura…

Get off the beaten path and walk around. Kamakura was great for this.

Kamakura-View
View of Kamakura from Temple stairs
KamakuraStatue
A statue holding a statue of Buddha.

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Kamakura Temple: Prayer Tablets

YokohamaTemplePrayerTablets

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PHOTO: Macha Green Tea with Candy Sweets

MachaKamakura2015

A bowl of Macha Green Tea during our visit to our favorite bamboo temple in Kamakura. Check out our old blog, “Japanese Tea Ceremony: The Way of Tea

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ぼくの鎌倉大仏 (My Kamakura Daibutsu)

My Amida Buddha... circa 2008
My Amida Buddha photo… circa 2008

Back in my art history days, in high school, I remember Daibutsu (The Great Buddha). And to be perfectly honest I never thought I’d see him in person. Now that I have, photos don’t do him any justice.

Kamakura is one of our favorite places in Japan. You should go see it yourself. Theres so much that isn’t on the brochure…

“The Great Buddha of Kamakura is a monumental outdoor bronze statue of Amitābha Buddha located at the Kōtoku-in Temple in Kamakura, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. The bronze statue probably dates from 1252, in the Kamakura period, according to temple records. It was preceded by a giant wooden Buddha, which was completed in 1243 after ten years of continuous labor, the funds having been raised by Lady Inada (Inada-no-Tsubone) and the Buddhist priest Jōkō of Tōtōmi. That wooden statue was damaged by a storm in 1248, and the hall containing it was destroyed, so Jōkō suggested making another statue of bronze, and the huge amount of money necessary for this and for a new hall was raised for the project. The bronze image was probably cast by Ōno Gorōemon or Tanji Hisatomo, both leading casters of the time. At one time, the statue was gilded. There are still traces of gold leaf near the statue’s ears. It is unclear, however, whether the statue constructed in 1252 is the same statue as the present statue.

The hall was destroyed by a storm in 1334, was rebuilt, and was damaged by yet another storm in 1369, and was rebuilt yet again. The last building housing the statue was washed away in the tsunami of September 20, 1498, during the Muromachi period. Since then, the Great Buddha has stood in the open air.

The statue is approximately 13.35 meters tall including the base and weighs approximately 93 tonnes. The statue is hollow, and visitors can view the interior. Many visitors over the years have left graffiti on the inside of the statue. At one time, there were thirty-two bronze lotus petals at the base of the statue, but only four remain, and they are no longer in place. A notice at the entrance to the grounds reads, “Stranger, whosoever thou art and whatsoever be thy creed, when thou enterest this sanctuary remember thou treadest upon ground hallowed by the worship of ages. This is the Temple of Bhudda (sic) and the gate of the eternal, and should therefore be entered with reverence.”

The Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923 destroyed the base the statue sits upon, but the base was repaired in 1925. Repairs to the statue were carried out in 1960-1961, when the neck was strengthened and measures were taken to protect it from earthquakes.” – Wikipedia

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Kamakura Garden

This week has been a little crazy for me so I’d like to share a photo from my first trip to Japan back in 2008.

A Garden in Kamakura, circa 2008
A Garden in Kamakura, Summer circa 2008

I’m neither a “country boy” nor a “city boy” but a nice mixture of both. I love images that reflect this.

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Generation who?

Sassa Narimasa the Japanese warlord of the Sen...
Sassa Narimasa the Japanese warlord of the Sengoku through Azuchi-Momoyama period

What generation do you consider yourself from?

Post “Baby-boomer”, it seems like everyone has their own set of dates that determine whether they’re really Generation X, Y, Z or Millennial. Others have based this on pop culture values or trends from their childhood. For me, who knows? I think I’m “X” although I’ve been told “Y”. Why? Couldn’t tell ya’.

So as some of us continue to ponder whether or not we’re part of Generation X, Y,or Z in America (yes, it is an American thing) I have learned that the Japanese don’t name their generations or eras like us. Why would they, they’re Japanese?

For example, we are all living in the Heisei period (1989-Present) but my wife, myself, her parents and her grandparents were all born in the Showa period (1926-1989). When your watching Samurai movies dated in “Feudal Japan” most likely it’s a story that takes place between the Kamakura period and Azuchi-Momoyama period (1185 – 1603). Immediately after were the Edo (1603 – 1868) and Meiji periods (1868 – 1912).

  • The Kamakura period was named as such because the city was the center of power for the Kamakura shogunate.
  • The Azuchi-Momoyama periods are named for the castle Azuchi and the castle Momoyama that were both considered to be very powerful.
  • Edo, the new capital city back then, is the former name of Tokyo while Meiji was the name of the Emperor who brought about changes that evolved into what we consider modern Japan.
  • Heisei means, “Achieving Peace” or “Peace and Accomplishment”.

So with this kind of rationale, could Presidencies be considered as eras? We live in the Obama Period which was preceded by the Bush Period? Never mind, that doesn’t sound pleasant at all.

So fellow Heisei-ers, what generation are you?

Old Samurai
Edo Period Samurai (c.1860)

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