American Hikikomori: The Characters

First and foremost we’d like to thank Vanessa Smith, Tony Shaff, Kyoka Shiraiwa, and Jessica Everleth for contributing to our INDIEGOGO campaign! We could not do this without your support.

Isamu-Fujihara
Isamu Fujihara (played by Yuto Serata)

American Hikikomori is a film about loneliness and self induced isolation. Overwhelming pressures to succeed, feelings of rejection or abandonment, and even a great sense of failure can drive one to loneliness or isolation. In a sense, all three of the major characters are coping with a type of loneliness and isolation in their own way. American Hikikomori is also a film about the dissolution of a family as they each choose to isolate themselves from each other.

Isamu's-Father
Isamu’s Father (played by Naoyuki Ikeda)

In Japan, Isamu Fujihara, our protagonist, could be considered a typical teenager. Not necessarily a super popular student but an “A” student with friends and great potential for a prosperous future. However, once his parents’ marriage falls apart, Isamu’s world is turned upside down. After a bitter divorce, his father is granted custody of Isamu and takes him to the U.S. to finish school. Because of a language barrier, overall social rejection, and growing contempt for his father, Isamu shuts down and secludes himself to his room.

Isamu's-Grandmother
Isamu’s Grandmother (played by Akiko Shima)

Isamu’s father is a traveling businessman who spent too much time on the road and not enough time looking after his family. A fresh divorcee after twenty years of marriage, his wife abandoned him and his teenage son. Unable to fully accept his failed marriage, he continues to hide behind his work leaving his teenage son, Isamu, displaced in a new country with his elderly mother. Isamu’s grandmother runs the household while his father is away but she pampers Isamu too much. An elderly widow, also in a foreign country, she tries to support Isamu’s father as he tries to further his career and pick up the pieces of his failed marriage.

For more information on our cast, simply follow the link to our website. You can help us finish our film by joining our team!

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info@americanhikikomori.com

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Karma Chamelion…

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Last entry for the year!!

Found this video while tweeting a little while back. One thing Japan is not… (to me) is boring. Thank you for reading!!

Happy New Year!

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Somewhere in Japan: Fujigoko (Winter 2010)

Every time I’ve gone to Japan, I’ve been fortunate enough to explore Tokyo and the surrounding prefectures. As a result, I’ve taken hundreds of photos.

I thought I’d share some more.

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Welcome to Fujigoko
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Most street signs featured silhouettes of Fuji-san.
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Regional Old house.
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Regional modernized house with traditional roofing.
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Modern estate. We were all hoping someone would come out and invite us in for tea…
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Abstract closeup of the pond. Looks like a painting.
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Another. No camera tricks other than a polarizer.
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One of my favorite photos from that day.
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I think we were at an old corn mill. Although we had (really great) soba for lunch.
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This place was packed with people but I still managed to steal this shot. I think this was attempt five or six. Totally worth the effort and wait.
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Roof Closeup
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The only (say it like a Nihonjin) Ma-ku-do-na-lu-do’s I ever saw written in Katakana. The rest were in english.

Check us out on Facebook and Twitter. Or sign up for our Newsletter through our Website. We’re not just making a film, but trying to build a small community around it.